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In the United States, the problems of obesity are known for a long time, but they don’t yet growing worse. A new report shows that no State has registered an overall decline in its rate of obesity in 2017, while six States have seen an increase.

The report, signed by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, analysis 15 years obesity trends, and their impact on health and the U.S. economy. The new results suggest that from 2015 to 2016, 39.6% of adults had a body mass index of 30 or more (France obesity key 15.8% of men and 15.6% of women). Nearly 40 percent of adults are thus considered “obese”. If this rate of obesity – well that high – is remained relatively stable last year for most States, six on the other hand are today poor students. They recorded an increase in their rates of obesity: Iowa, Ohio, Oklahoma, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and South Carolina.

Obesity is a complex and often intractable problem and the epidemic of obesity in the United States continues to have serious consequences on health and costs for individuals, their families and our nation,” said John Auerbach, CEO of Trust for America’s Health. In addition to the health risks for the individuals themselves (hypertension, diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular disorders), obesity problems are also very expensive overseas. They represent 149 billion in annual direct health spending, and 66 billion dollars in lost productivity, according to the report.

Noting some progress: obesity rates seem slightly decrease among the children aged two and four. “The good news is that it is increasingly obvious that some prevention programs can reverse these trends,” John Auerbach. “But we won’t see significant drops in national obesity rates so that they are not being implemented across the country and receive long-term support.”

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